728 x 90

Hockey and Jiu-Jitsu were his teachers-Keeseekoowenin’s Jason Bone gives back to First Nations community

Hockey and Jiu-Jitsu were his teachers-Keeseekoowenin’s Jason Bone gives back to First Nations community

Treaty 2 Territory-Jason Bone has a busy life. The 38 year-old holds down a full time job with Treaty 2, is working on his Phd in Native Studies at Brandon University and recently successfully completed his Black Belt requirements in Jiu-Jitsu. “I was introduced to the art in 2005 but it wasn’t until 2008 that

Treaty 2 Territory-Jason Bone has a busy life.
The 38 year-old holds down a full time job with Treaty 2, is working on his Phd in Native Studies at Brandon University and recently successfully completed his Black Belt requirements in Jiu-Jitsu.
“I was introduced to the art in 2005 but it wasn’t until 2008 that I got a gi and started training,” said Bone. “Ju-Jitsu helped me with after hockey concussions and to get back in shape without head trauma.”
Bone’s hockey career spanned nine seasons and saw him play in mining towns like Flin Flon and Sudbury to places like Florida and Fort Worth, Texas.
He dropped the gloves on a nightly basis during a time that pre-dated concussion protocols.
That’s where his story takes a turn.
He began to experience dizzy spells during practice and a visit to the doctor confirmed he had suffered a number of head injuries.
He was told there are about twenty different types of concussions and he figures he suffered at least a few of them, experiencing flashes in his vision and headaches.
He would sometimes hear things through the hockey grapevine and it bothered him.
“Nobody was talking about concussions, you would shake it off,” said Bone. “Derek Boogard and Wade Belak incidents started happening around that time.”
He knew it was time to hang up the skates.
“I was happy to leave the hockey culture for a while and start to relearn how to live a regular life with a day job.”
“Sometimes I read about other guys regretting what they did (fighting). But I am happy with what the game did for me. If I didn’t have hockey I wouldn’t have the opportunity that I got.”
“I got into college and started training in Jiu Jitsu and stayed with it throughout my schooling.”
He earned his black belt in late March under the superivision of()
“With a family schedule it’s hard. It took me a while to get it. I never thought about quitting but there were times when I didn’t deserve the promotions I received but it was explained that was the ebb and flow of the journey,” said Bone.
“It’s like a thinking man’s sport. Your mind is working constantly. How am I going to get out of this? Positions, escaping holds,” said Bone.
One of the benefits of his journey is his the development of others by bringing Jiu-Jitsu to First Nation communities, bringing it to Roseau River and Berens River First Nations as well as Southeast College in Winnipeg where he instructed others in the art.
“There are still some kids who come and train at Academy 64 and we have a big group in Roseau, 2 purple belts and several beginners as well as a black belt,” he said.
The journey has yielded it’s own reward as Bone now has a new goal.
He wants to build a champion.
“In Dubai it took ten years to build a world champion and we think there is one here in Manitoba. The goal is to find them.”

Posts Carousel

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked with *

Latest Posts

Top Authors

Most Commented

Featured Videos